Skip to main content

About your Search

20130627
20130705
SHOW
Book TV 17
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 45
SFGTV2 34
CSPAN 31
CSPAN2 29
CNNW 22
FBC 21
KGO (ABC) 18
COM 15
CURRENT 14
SFGTV 12
KQED (PBS) 11
KPIX (CBS) 9
LINKTV 9
KRCB (PBS) 8
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 7
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 355
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 358 (some duplicates have been removed)
summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's will send you a
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil right
had long been a stooge of the concerns of african-americans. astute civil rights -- to the concerns of african- americans. a great civil rights person said he was astute to this before others were. his political career in missouri was largely dependent on being responsive to african-american voters. about that. more >> >> when the president truman was a senator, he was elected pendergastthe machine. he ran against former missouri governor loyde stark. the onlyst election -- election that mattered at that time, the democratic primary, the closest since 1822 in the state of missouri. president truman carried it by less than 5000 votes. lloyd stark was a widely known ardent segregationist. african-americans voted in kansas city and in st. louis. it is hard to think of any of them, any number that -- any of them casting their ballot for lloyd stark. his secondruman owed term as senator, without which he would not have been vice president, to black voters. tavis: it does not seem likely he came to the conclusion on his own or it was an altruistic gesture, the right thing to do. that is w
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
of the civil rights movement: it invalidated a key part of the voting rights act, the law enactd in 1965 to stop racial discrimination at the polls. >> at issue was a provision in the act that singled out states with a history of discrimination and voting mostly in the south and required them to get preclearance, approval from the federal government before changing voting procedures. >> stephen: ladies and gentlemen, as a son of the south from one of the states covered by the preclearance provision of the voting rights act i want to thank the supreme court for finally setting my people free. it was a 5-4 decision with chief justice roberts joined by justices scalia, thomas, alito and deen. now, everybody is better with butter. now, folks, in his decision gutting the voting rights act, chief justice roberts sagely noted something many of us had apparently missed about discrimination saying, quote, nearly fist years later things have changed dramatically. true. for instance, there used to be a voting rights act. but we don't need it now because apparently racism is over. now i can do anyth
for civil rights and education here in san francisco and our mission is to advance civil and human rights through education. and this is quite an honor to be here this evening. and you know just briefly, my father was born in oakland, california. and fred coramatzo thought of himself as an american citizen and that what motivated him to take a stand against the military orders that were issued during world war ii that forced removed 120,000 of japanese ancestry from the west coast. he worked on redress after his conviction was over turned in 1983 after it was found in the government's own files that the incarceration was of not military necessity and that there was government misconduct. and he worked on the redress and ref rations movement that led to the civil rights act of 1988 and then my father's mission became education. he crisscrossed this nation so that the lessons of history would not be forgotten. and in 2010, with the signing of the legislative bill, establishing fred of the civil liberties and the constitution on january 30th, my father's birthday, we through the institute de
exciting to see everybody talking about civil rights litigate or heroes which i think they are. >> what is next in the film and what do you see for film and how do people learn more about it. >> the film will be on hbo in july in the summer series which is great because they do a lot of marketing. we are selecting the open night. which is a thousand seat audience. it is the premier selection. it's at the film festival as it went to sundance and they voted it and it's a film we would like to bring home. we are doing as many film festivals as we can. we won the audience award and jury award in miami and doing as many speaking and community talk back events. the film i hope will become a gathering point for people to use and say this is what's happening in our jurisdiction. this shows the experience of just a few lawyers. there are many people struggling to do a great job across the country. >> what's your website? >> we'll be taking questions. now let's move to john rapping who is one of the individuals featured in the film. john, i remember when you first talked about starting a training
that in california, while that victory at the presidential level was being celebrated as a civil rights milestone, california also that same night in that same election on that same ballot voted to take away existing marriage rights from california same-sex couples. that whiplash moment, the that california, alone, experienced the night president obama was first elected, that moment was referenced yesterday. it was brought up unprompted by one of the plaintiffs in the california same-sex marriage case that was decided yesterday at the supreme court. >> in 2008 when we elected the first african-american president, it was a glorious day, but later that night it was a horrible night when the returns for prop 8 came in saying that we were going to be treated as second-class citizens, and we just could not fathom being treated like that anymore. >> so it was that moment in 2008 when we simultaneously had this great civil rights advance of electing an african-american president, and also the civil rights reverse in terms of gay couples in california. that moment in 2008. now, this week, we are essentia
harris wants it all sped up. >> we cannot delay or deny individuals their civil rights. and for that reason again i urge the 9th circuit court of appeals to lift the stay as quickly as possible. >> normally the waiting peeryard is -- period is 25 days. that would be july 21. she doesn't want to wait that long but she may have no choice. >> today the governor told all california counties be ready to issue marriage licenses to same- sex couple as soon as the court lifts the stay. >>> president obama is with his family but from air force one he called to congratulate the couples who fought prop 8 saying we are proud of you guys. one couple invited the president to their second wedding. >>> the other decision, more of a national impact, doma, defense of marriage act. they are allowing same-sex couple spouses to receive benefits. 5 justices for the repeal. 4 against. kpix's linda yee on how they came to their decision and the impact has t has on -- it has on duchess of on -- on gay couples. >> reporter: a stigma upon all who enter same-sex marriages made lawful by the author
was not so much about lgbt rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, t
one of the pillars of the civil rights movement. >> strikes down a key part of the voting rights act. >> it was a 5-4 decision with chief justice roberts joined by justices scalia, thomas -- >> i might not be here as president except for those who helped pass the voting rights act. >> the supreme court has declared the federal defense of marriage act unconstitutional. >> it cannot take up the challenge to california's proposition 8. >> one judge in particular making the difference. >> anthony kennedy, does he have some clerk that's happen to be gays? >> i thought our arguments were sound and every unelse's were insane. >> nobody in this country has ever been denied the right to get married. >> knock, knock. who's there? >> thanks for joining us this afternoon. it has been another busy week from a stand-off on women's rights to the trial of george zimmerman, the president's trip to africa and landmark supreme court decisions. it was a week that both answered and raised new questions about what it means to be equal in this country. we start with the big news at the supreme court this w
with civil rights is abundantly clear, while he embraced gandy, informed by the civil rights movement in the u.s. one of the first pauses for us here in a post civil rights movement world were the campaigns against apartheid in africa. >> my first act in the anti-apartheid movement in 1970 and 80 because i was inspired in what was going on in africa. >> our involvement in africa gave americans beneficiaries of our parents' battles for civil rights here the chance to support our brothers and sisters there. it was our chance to support their continued struggle that culminated in what was once thought to be impossible, the next of nelson mandela. as our first black president tours africa, the well-being and possible loss of mandela is on everyone's mind. even president obama's. >> i think he's a hero for the world. if and when he passes from this place, one thing i think we'll all know is that his legacy is one that will linger on throughout the ages. >> as we witness the supreme court-imposed sunset of key civil rights achievements here in the u.s., we are simultaneously seeing the suns
and so cancerous that we had to do civil rights act, voting rights act. >> stephen: fine. then we'll just have a new voting rights act. it wasn't that hard to pass the first time, was it? >> very, very difficult to pass. stephen: congress can get stuff done, sir. >> here's a great, a mini-history lesson about the civil rights movement. >> stephen: i'll try to stay awake. >> 1954 to 1965, the brown public school desegregation decision civil rights act of '64 voting rights act of '65, crown jewel is the voting rights act of '65. martin luther king, jr., selma, congressman john lewis got his skull fractured trying to demonstrate. >> stephen: hey, baby i was at the march on washington. you don't have to tell me. i was at the "i have a dream speech." don't play that back people went on marches card. i was at the marches. were you? >> i was not. stephen: you were not at the marches. >> i was not born in 1965. stephen: i could be madder than you. oh, i wasn't born that. that's a convenient excuse. thank you so much for joining us me. dark days, bright nights. we'll be right captioning sponsored
rights act of 1965. widely considered to be one of the most effective pieces of civil rights legislation passed in the last 50 years. the act prohibits states from imposing any voting qualification or prerequisite to voting or enacting any standard practice or procedure that denies any u.s. citizen the right to vote on the basis of race. after the enactment, states could no longer deny african- americans the right to vote. segregation had been the law of the land. civil rights workers were murdered. african-american churches and the homes of african-american leaders were routinely bombed. under section 5 of the act, states and localities with a history of discrimination must seek preclearance of changes in voting rules that could have an impact on minorities. on tuesday of this past week in a 5-4 decision in shelby county versus holder, the supreme court struck down 4 of the act that provided the formula that governed which jurisdictions were required to have voting changes precleared. the court's majority held that section 4 was unconstitutional because it is based on outdated statistic
barbara, the president and executive director of the lawyers committee for civil rights civil rights under law. i'm here today to speak to this decision. i want to say two thing straight up about the decision. one, it is deeply disturbing. it undermines and puts our democracy at risk. nothing is more important than ensuring that every single voter is free from racial discrimination and ethnic discrimination in the exercise of their vote. today's decision severely undermine the legal protections that have been vital for more than almost five decades of protecting voters of all nationalities. i also want to say the second problem is that this decision is a betrayal of the american people. there is nothing more critical than making sure that the highest court in our land gets it right when it comes to what the appropriate coverage is for protecting american people. four of the voting rights act, by saying that the formula is outdated. the court has made a misstep of tremendous proportions by making that decision when congress had 15,000 pages of records that it generated from hearings. they l
where abe is narl director and i chair the national civility rights committee has a mission to promote justice and fair treatment for all. as part of this mission, antidefamation league has worked for years that the epidemic of hate online is harming individuals and society. while certain aspects of internet hate have received national and international attention, like cyberbull using, unfortunately the problem in general is not high in the consciousness of the internet community, of parents, educators, and of leaders, and we believe that the indifference to a growing and harmful problem needs to change. we care about these issues not just because we're civil rights activists and have seen the effects of attacks, physical and verbal, on minorities. but this is also personal. abe is a holocaust survivor and is from the place and time were prop gap da was the accomplice to the deaths of millions. as abe explains it, the holocaust didn't begin with the of ovens, it began with words. last month at a forum abe and i explained the virus of hate is spreading every day in ways that hoyt explor
on his experiences during the civil rights movement. and then a ceremony at the u.s. capitol for john dingell who became the longest-serving member of congress last month. after that, highlights from our series on america's first ladies. congress is on break for the fourth of july. when the house returns, lawmakers will begin crafting a strategy to consider immigration legislation. republicans are scheduled to meet behind closed doors to map out a plan. senators are expected to take up the issue of student loan rates, which doubled on july 1. for the rest of the month the house and senate will devote their time to moving the annual spending bills that fund the government. the agriculture bill is ready for action and the senate appropriations committee has completed work on four of the 12 bills. all chambers return on monday at 2 p.m. eastern. america is the land of opportunity. there are so many things you can accomplish in my lifetime and really my daughter has hollow those opportunities. i think that is one of the greatest things about america. she can do whatever she wants. it does
between civil rights and sacred rights. >> same-sex marriage will be put to vote here in maryland. sex marriage in the state of maryland. in african-le american children -- churches all hopped [no audio] between gays and african- americans. >> all the sudden, it was black person is gay. >> our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. >> he asked, when are you getting married? >> well, we are working on it. >> regardless of what laws they may write, god designed the family. >> who has been the hardest hit in the issue of family? the african-american community. >> we were blasphemous and not to compare the gay movement with the right for civil rights. is gay the new black? >> i believe this election ought to be a referendum on the church, a referendum on black preachers. >> if we do not reach out to these people, who will? opposition. god does not make lesbians. finish.e >> sensuality in african- american community is taboo. we do not discuss it in any form. >> i felt like could not be myself because i would shame you. i ain't
. >> this is about the community finding its voice. >> reporter: also in the '60s, inspired by the civil rights movement -- >> every american citizen has the right. >> reporter: -- franklin fired from his job because he was gay organized a picket in front of the white house and argued his case in front of the u.s. supreme court. while denied, it's the first gay civil rights claim. it won't be the last. [ singing [ >> reporter: in 2003 a group of gay veterans gathered in the castro took down the rainbow flag, replacing it with the american flag. on this day, a momentous decision. the u.s. supreme court ruled state sodomy laws were unconstitutional. consenting adults could no longer be arrested and thrown in jail for loving each other. >> so eliminating those types of law allowed us to exist. >> reporter: in the '60s, '70s and '80s, the gay rights movement exploded in san francisco! jeff was there. >> what about basic humanity? >> reporter: from the united airlines boycott that demanded equal benefits for domes partners to the 1978 election of harvey milk to the 2004 winter of love when mayor ga
important civil rights law. >> the supreme court has knocked down one of pillars of the civil rights movement. >> a key provision cannot be enforced until congress redraws the enforcement map. >> jon: sampling of coverage on the voting rights acted and liberal press pan that go ruling and high court ruled again key parts of the defense of marriage act deciding not to rule on the prop 8 case in california. gay rights people rallied around those decisions. >> that is cnn openly gay anchor going into a gay bar in new york it was a first for him and for us, as well. what a contrast in coverage. it seems like media on voting rights thing, didn't mention that most of voting rights act was left intact. >> i mean we have msnbc that gave us great legal mind al sharpton. besides sounding ridiculous it makes the left wing media and msnbc this is partisan hack job. very few reporters was telling us this was a 1965 act and that times have changed. it was very little analysis of why we would need a 1965 fix-it law today in 2013. that commentary was lost. al sharpton and others like blacks could no
in the day things from the civil rights movement and slavery. and i ran across something from the 1970s, right? which was roots. and it's levar burton being toby. let's watch and we'll talk to levar. >> your name is toby. you're going to learn to say your name. let me hear you say it. what's your name? say it louder so we all can hear you. what's your name? >> toby. my name is toby. >> that's a good -- >> what do you think? >> well, you know, the word is really charged. i'm of an age where i have -- i've been exposed to, i've heard that word used all of my life. and having really become a words person in my life, don, i fully understand the power of words. for me the word "nigger" is just that, it's a word. i know that it's really, really highly charged for a lot of people. i have -- my relationship with the word has evolved over time. at this point in my life, what i come down to always, don, is not the words themselves but what is the intent that is being used behind the words that we use? and for me, that is the bottom line. the word itself does not have that much of a charge for me
in california. a huge day! a huge day for civil rights (cheers and applause) >> and all of this is the subject of tonight's special report. >> yes, yesterday america took a giant bold leap into the present. and it was a 5-4 decision with one judge in particular making the difference. >> the importance of anthony kennedy cannot be overstated. >> there have only been three gay rights, major gay rights decisions in the history of the supreme court. >> all three of those cases were written by anthony kennedy. he will go down in history as in essence the father of constitutional gay rights. >> yeah, and the good kind of father of something gay. not the kind of father who insists you throw a football with him and it would never come to a single one of your show choir performances. you might not think it's important, dad, but it's important to me! of course-- of course. not every one was happy with this decision. but someone was exactly as unhappy with it as you would imagine. scalia. the justice whose name most resembles a g.i. joe villean. >> he said the court a opinion talking about the one striki
's oldest and largest guy pride events. make no mistake, the fight to advance guy rights is the civil rights issue of our time. and this fight is far from over. currently only 13 states in the district of columbia have ggay marriage. they will say anything to stop gay rights from advancing in this country. just this morning jim demint were spreading this bogus lie. >> you've got 37 states where the people have decided that they want to protect the marriage between a man and a woman because they know that that's the environment where children can thrive and succeed. that's been proven. it is really about the best environment for children. better for children. >> research is very clear that the idea would s for raisings our children should be the idea here. the desire of adults should trump the need of children. >> fringe republicans wasting no time trashing the supreme court and guy americans after the ruling came down. tea party congressman was so upset he was talking about the end of a great civilization. >> they were not aware that most wise man in history, soloman, said there's nothing ne
and civil rights, it's a sad day in our country and certainly in our state. we know that these same-sex couples have been denied equal protection under the law for far too long. >> dan: there are several california lawmakers who are deeply and personally affected by today's decision. capital correspondent nannette miranda has that part of our coverage tonight from sacramento. >> assembly speaker is the first openly gay speaker. he says it's very personal. >> this is first time in my life that i felt that the law fully recognized he as being equal to everyone else. >> the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender caucus embraced as they shared the news together. they are the first openly gay married state lawmakers. their ceremonies were held during that brief period when same-sex marriages were legal. wedding plans have begun for some. >> we will not lie about who they are in state house or family house. those are things we take away from today. >> some conservative groups are upset. >> children are the victims here. next generation is going to be very confused about marriage, sex, rel
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 358 (some duplicates have been removed)